realenglishfruit

Top fruit tree growing advice and information from Real English Fruit

Monthly Archives: April 2011

Golden Pippin

Golden Pippin

Golden Pippin

A very old variety, already well known around 1650. It is a small fruiting variety with a strong flavour.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties with a provisional order

Golden Noble

Golden Noble

Golden Noble

Another winner, almost completely forgotten. It has been cropping in my daughter’s garden for years. It is indeed golden in appearance and noble in character. It dates from around the early 1800s. If grown well it makes a good sized apple. Pick it by the middle of September, store it in a cool place and it will keep until December time in good order. You can cook it or eat it. Once planted it begins to crop very quickly. Very little trouble in growing it as it looks well after itself. It does like enough moisture around its roots. Therefore do not plant it in a bed of grass or weeds. It originates from Downham Market in Norfolk.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties with a provisional order

Fiesta

Also known as Red Pippin. We have a lot of experience in growing this apple variety. I even remember the time when it was first introduced. This is one of the apples which is greatly undervalued. It was introduced in 1972 by Dr. Alston, at that time the breeder at East Malling Research Station in Kent. The mark that I would give to this apple is 9 out of 10. It eats well, it keeps well and it looks attractive. It doesn’t shrivel easily. The fruit is crisp and of decent size. One of the parents is Cox’s Orange Pippin. Irrespective of weather conditions it crops every year. It is a partially self-fertile diploid variety, so it will produce a crop as a single tree, though it benefits from a pollination partner. It is very easy to grow, and it is suitable for all parts of the UK. It is a super pollinator and does not need a lot of room. By January it still has a very good flavour. Primarily an eating apple, it also produces an excellent apple juice.The perfect apple to train as an espalier or grow on M26 as a cordon.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties with a provisional order

Fiesta, photo courtesy of Bob Franklin/flickr.com

Fiesta, photo courtesy of Bob Franklin/flickr.com

Epicure

Laxton Epicure

Laxton Epicure

Its full name is Laxton Epicure. Like Ellison’s Orange, one of its parents is Cox Orange Pippin. It is a late August sweet apple and does not need a lot of room. In the garden of my neighbour it pollinates Bramley’s Seedling cooking apple very well. However it does help to have another diploid variety planted near it, as the Bramley tree is unable to pollinate the Epicure. Without doubt it is a good apple for August time.
It is suitable for planting up North, as it has a good frost resistance. A healthy tree, regular cropper and the children at home for the summer holidays love to eat it.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties with a provisional order

Ellison’s Orange

Ellisons Orange

Ellisons Orange

We have had quite a lot of experience in growing Ellison’s Orange. It likes well-drained soil. Any difficulty with drainage and canker is quite a problem. If you really like an apple of intense flavour and are able to pick it when it is just right from the maturity point of view, then this is the apple to go for. Do not try to keep it for long as the aniseed flavour, which is very mild the first 2 weeks, becomes quite strong. It is a lot easier to grow then Cox’s Orange Pippin. It even does well on quite thin, chalky types of soils as long as the tree is well mulched. It has a good level of resistance against spring frosts and scab. It is a regular cropper and needs to be pruned lightly in the early years.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties with a provisional order

Blenheim Orange

Blenheim Orange

Blenheim Orange

This apple can be slow coming into cropping. However if grown on rootstock M26 and well pollinated, and little pruned in the early years, I have found it to be doing well. It is a triploid variety and therefore two other diploid apple varieties should be planted at the same time. Pick it around late September/ early October time. It is a large apple and it does keep well over the winter months. It is a very successful multi-purpose apple; you can bake it, freeze it, cook it and eat it.  It is an old variety, and it was already known in the late 1700. As a variety it was stocked by various nursery men, and mentioned in their lists of varieties available around 1825.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties with a provisional order

Bountiful

Bountiful

Bountiful

This is not a classic variety, but all the same it is worth mentioning. It is a good cooking apple like Bramley. However it is a very suitable tree for a small garden, while Bramley is too vigorous in situations like that. Also another advantage it that it is a diploid variety, and therefore only needs one pollinator. It is a very fertile variety and crops every year.
It doesn’t keep the length of time as Bramley. By late November the apples will be yellow in colour and can be eaten as a dessert apple. The parents of this variety are Lane Prince Albert and Cox’s Orange Pippin.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties with a provisional order

Bramley’s Seedling

Bramley's Seedling

Bramley’s Seedling

This is an excellent cooking apple, but for the average gardener it is quite a challenge to grow. Firstly, it is a very strongly-growing tree, and it will need a lot of room when worked on the standard rootstock MM106. If grown on M26, it is a very easy tree to manage. However, Bramley on the rootstocks EMLA 9 or M26 is bound to fall over once in full cropping mode, if not supported and tied to a treated stake of 3 inch diameter and 6 foot height. I have seen many Bramley trees in that situation over the years. It is relatively slow to come into cropping. Once established it crops very well and as a cooker is hard to beat. Good pollinators are Grenadier and Howgate Wonder.
If the tree is pruned too hard, fruit quality suffers; brown spots in the flesh, called bitter pit, may then be a regular occurance. The best is to aim for moderate growth. The best method of pruning is simply to remove crossing branches and dead wood.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties with a provisional order

Braeburn

Braeburn

Braeburn

There are various types of Braeburn. The tree originates from New Zealand. It is a healthy tree and has good storage characteristics. It flowers every year and fruitset is not normally a problem. What can be a problem is the flavour. In cold summers, a good flavour does not always develop. This is caused by the fact that this variety does best in warm summers with plenty of sunshine. Therefore it is best to harvest the apples late in the season; end of October/early November. The fruit will stay crisp for a long time, and fruit losses due to rotting are usually very low.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties with a provisional order

Charles Ross

Charles Ross

Charles Ross

This is a variety which is suitable for planting anywhere in the UK. The apple is quite large and is best when eaten in the September-October period. It is also one of the few varieties which do well on chalky soils. It is a good diploid variety and pollinators such as the long keeping apples, Fiesta or Red Pippin, are ideal. It has an upright growing habit and is very suitable for the smaller garden. It crops regularly without much effort. It is fairly resistant to scab and tree canker.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties with a provisional order