realenglishfruit

Top fruit tree growing advice and information from Real English Fruit

Monthly Archives: January 2014

Compact Stella

Compact Stella

Compact Stella

A self-fertile tree (no pollinator required) that produces a fine array of blossom, and superb dark crimson fruit, firm and juicy, which can be picked in July and August. The tree will begin cropping one or two years after planting.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties in a provisional order

Walnut

Walnuts, photo courtesy of Molly Holzschlag/flickr.com

Walnuts, photo courtesy of Molly Holzschlag/flickr.com

Walnut trees grown for their fruit are self-fertile. They are hardy, and positively like cold winters. According to variety, they may come into production only after 5 to 6 years. Remember that walnut leaves are toxic to other plants and trees, and so the tree should be positioned with care. Don’t put walnut leaves into your compost. Do not plant fruit trees close to walnut trees. Grafted walnut trees are a special item, much more expensive, but they need less room.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties in a provisional order

Morus nigra – mulberry

Mulberry, photo courtesy of Cantaloupe Alone/flickr.com

Mulberry, photo courtesy of Cantaloupe Alone/flickr.com

The mulberry is a beautiful tree that spreads, and it gradually acquires a fascinating crooked and gnarled appearance. It produces juicy-purplish-black fruit resembling a blackberry, of superb flavour that can be eaten as it is, or used in desserts and preserves – or even for wine. It ripens from mid-August to September, and it tends to fall from the tree as soon as it is ripe. This is why you never find mulberries in supermarkets: it is just too delicate! So it is ideal as a unique, original tree for the garden. The fruit ripens over an extended period of time and so you can enjoy it day by day.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties in a provisional order

Cobnut

Cobnuts, photo courtesy of Ida@Sustain/flickr.com

Cobnuts, photo courtesy of Ida@Sustain/flickr.com

The cobnut is basically a cultivated hazel. The tree is self-sterile, but if you have hedgerows or woodland nearby, pollen from the yellow catkins of wild hazels will fertilize the flowers. If not, you should plant two varieties. The tree is robust, hardy and easy to grow; the nuts are great!

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties in a provisional order

Malus robusta

Malus robusta, photo courtesy of Jukka Heinonen/flickr.com

Malus robusta, photo courtesy of Jukka Heinonen/flickr.com

This relatively small tree is much-loved for its large clusters of red crab apples that create a striking sight right through to January. Blossom is white and fragrant. This crab apple is a good pollinator for all dessert apple varieties.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties in a provisional order

Malus John Downie

Malus John Downie, photo courtesy of Andy/Andrew Fogg/flickr.com

Malus John Downie, photo courtesy of Andy/Andrew Fogg/flickr.com

A self-fertile crab apple producing lovely pink-white blossom, and large, red-flushed yellow fruit in autumn. This is the best crab apple variety for making jelly.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties in a provisional order

Malus evereste

Malus evereste crab apple, photo courtesy of Stadtkatze/flickr.com

Malus evereste crab apple, photo courtesy of Stadtkatze/flickr.com

A very attractive self-fertile tree with red bud that develops into beautiful white flowers and then into shiny yellow/red fruits. The tree is attractive in autumn as well, with its leaves that turn orange-yellow. The fruit remains on the tree well into December – much loved by birds. This crab apple is a good pollinator for all dessert apple varieties.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties in a provisional order

Brown Turkey

Brown Turkey, photo courtesy of desert native/flickr.com

Brown Turkey, photo courtesy of desert native/flickr.com

This is a self-fertile fig variety (no pollinator required), suitable for growing in the UK. It crops well, producing loads of sweet fruit with brownish skins and reddish flesh. The fruit is ripe in late August/September. You can enjoy the fruit fresh from the tree, and you can even try drying the figs in an airing cupboard, turning them every day (it will probably take about a week to complete the drying process).

The tree does best in a sheltered position, or as a fan-trained tree against a south-facing wall.. However the root run needs to be restricted, by planting the tree in a container, sunk into the soil. The container needs to have two fair-sized drainage holes, covered by broken parts of terra cotta pots. This to stop the drainage holes from blocking up over time.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties in a provisional order

Lord Napier

Lord Napier, photo courtesy of Bonnie Lee/flickr.com

Lord Napier, photo courtesy of Bonnie Lee/flickr.com

This nectarine produces fruit with the classic yellow-orange skin colour; it is juicy and flavoursome. The fruit ripens in early August. A reliable, heavy cropper. The tree is self-fertile (no pollinator required). Ideal in a sheltered spot or against a south-facing wall. The variety was introduced in Hertfordshire in 1860.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties in a provisional order

Rochester

Rochester, photo courtesy of Joe Sotelo/flickr.com

Rochester, photo courtesy of Joe Sotelo/flickr.com

A self-fertile peach variety (no pollinator required) that produces lovely deep pink blossom, and then large fruit with beautiful orange skin with red blush, yellow flesh and good flavour. It ripens in early August. It is particularly suitable for the UK because it flowers relatively late. It was introduced in New York in 1900.

Click here to go to the Tree Varieties page, where you can select this and other varieties in a provisional order